Sox and the City by Richard Roeper

Sox and the City: A Fan’s Love Affair with the White Sox from the Heartbreak of ’67 to the Wizards of Oz by Richard Roeper (2006)
From one White Sox fan to another, Roeper details his love of the White Sox and of baseball. His wry sense of humor takes you from his childhood in the 1960s through the championship season of 2005. It’s part memoir, part Sox history, and part baseball nostalgia. You don’t have to be a Sox fan to enjoy this book – and you can’t help but appreciate the movie and television trivia scattered throughout.

Get ready for Opening Day 2008 (March 31: Cubs vs. Milwaukee and the Sox at Cleveland) by checking out this book and others on our Chicago Baseball list. You can read about the Cubs and Sox in the World Series, look back at the history of Wrigley Field, and much more.

Bones: Season 1

Bones: Season 1 (2005-2006) TV-14

FBI agent Seeley Booth and forensic anthropologist Temperance “Bones” Brennan (David Boreanaz and Emily Deschanel) team up to solve cases no one else can handle. The pair bickers over everything from who gets to drive to whether Bones should be allowed to have a gun – all while catching murderers.

Bones has it all – the forensic aspect, the crime-solving mystery, and the personal side of things, not to mention humor. If you can’t get enough of CSI, you’ll definitely enjoy Bones. It has all of the science of CSI, but is more character driven. You get involved in the lives of Booth and Bones.

Season 2 of Bones is also available on DVD. The series is inspired by the life of forensic anthropologist and novelist Kathy Reichs.

The Greatest Generation Speaks by Tom Brokaw

The Greatest Generation Speaks: Letters and Reflections by Tom Brokaw (1999)
After the publication of the bestselling The Greatest Generation, Tom Brokaw received mail from readers across the country. The letters provide accounts of WWII soldiers who reconnected after fifty years because of a name mentioned in Brokaw’s book. Children and grandchildren wrote of the deceased soldiers they never knew – and how important the book was in understanding their ancestors. Others wrote of similar tales mentioned in The Greatest Generation, or pointed out areas of the war that Brokaw overlooked. At times heartrending and uplifting, Brokaw’s follow up to The Greatest Generation is truly inspiring.

The audiobook is a great way to “read” this book. Brokaw reads the introductions to the chapters, while a supporting cast reads the letters and accounts featured. The various voices allow the listener to move between stories with ease.

Match Me If You Can by Susan Elizabeth Phillips

Match Me If You Can by Susan Elizabeth Phillips (2005)
Heath Champion is determined to find a wife. The successful sports agent (and popular bachelor) wants to expedite the entire courtship process, so he hires professional matchmaker Portia Powers.

Annabelle Granger just inherited her grandmother’s matchmaking business – along with its septuagenarian clientele. After failing in her previous careers, Annabelle is determined to make this one work. She finagles an interview with Heath, who reluctantly agrees to a limited trial.

With both Portia and Annabelle introducing him to potential brides, Heath should be closer to finding a wife. And while his perfect match continues to elude him, Annabelle becomes more and more entangled in his life.

In this honorary Chicago Stars book, Phillips entertains with her usual combination of quirky comedy and deep emotion.

Size 12 is Not Fat by Meg Cabot

Size 12 is Not Fat by Meg Cabot (2006)
In the first book of her new mystery series, Cabot introduces us to former pop star Heather Wells. Her mom ran off with her manager and her money, and her dad’s in jail. Heather finds a job as an assistant dorm director at a New York college. Everything seems to be going well…until someone finds a dead body. Heather doesn’t think it was an accident, despite what the police say. She starts investigating, ignoring the advice of her landlord and crush (and her ex-boyfriend’s brother), P.I. Cooper Cartwright. Laugh out loud at this chick lit mystery as you follow the adventures -- and misadventures -- of Heather Wells.

If you want to read more Heather Wells escapades, check out the next books in the series: Size 14 is Not Fat Either (2006) and Big Boned (2007).

The Kitchen Boy by Robert Alexander

The Kitchen Boy by Robert Alexander (2003)
A man leaves his granddaughter a taped account of his time serving the Russian royal family during their imprisonment. How much of his recollection is the truth? Did any of the Romanovs survive? Find out in this riveting fictionalized account of the months leading to the execution of the Romanov family.

Shakespeare by Bill Bryson

Shakespeare: The World as Stage by Bill Bryson (2007)
As part of the Eminent Lives series, Bryson presents a brief (196 page) biography of William Shakespeare – brief, he explains, because so little is actually known about Shakespeare. In his quirky comedic style, Bryson elucidates on what few facts exist on Shakespeare’s life. General history is interwoven with specifics about the playwright (for example, up to 40% of brides were pregnant on their wedding day). With amusing anecdotes on farfetched theories (like the plays were actually written by Francis Bacon, a random aristocrat, or a combination thereof), Shakespeare is a quick, enjoyable read on a mysterious author’s life and times.

After you read the biography, if you're interested in reading Shakespeare's works, check out the library catalog or visit MIT's The Complete Works of William Shakespeare online. To find out more about Shakespeare -- his life, works, theater, FAQs -- visit the Folger Shakespeare Library website.

Dark Assassin by Anne Perry

Dark Assassin by Anne Perry (2006)
In Anne Perry’s fifteenth book featuring William Monk, the detective witnesses a couple engaged in a heated debate before they fall in the River Thames to their death. Was it murder? Suicide? Monk, with help from his wife Hester, is determined to find out, which leads to the discovery of a larger issue that could destroy all of London.