Blog

Wool by Hugh Howey (2013)

index.aspxThe outside is toxic and deadly. For generations, humankind has been confined to a massive underground silo. Everyone must serve a purpose and are tightly regulated to make sure nothing goes to waste. Step outside of the law, and you are sentenced to death by "cleaning" – sent outside with a suit designed to keep you alive only long enough to clean the exterior landscape cameras. Why all those sentenced actually go through with the cleaning is a mystery to those in the silo....

Juliette, a young woman from the mechanical division, is handpicked to become the next sheriff after the last one volunteered to clean. As she becomes acclimated to her new position, Juliette starts piecing together information that makes her question the purpose and motives of the Silo's leaders – information that could get her sentenced to clean in a heartbeat. Hugh Howey's suspenseful post-apocalyptic novel pulls the reader into the world of the Silo and precariously holds them right at the tip between order and chaos. The first in a trilogy, Wool will leave you scrambling for the next installment.

Orphan Train by Christina Baker Kline (2013)

index.aspxChristina Baker Kline introduces a fairly unexplored piece of American history in this tender story of two resilient women navigating their way through the past and into the future. Orphan Train is a touching story of two characters whose lives intertwine with one another, opening up buried secrets, upheaval, and an unexpected friendship.

Foster teen Molly Ayer finds herself serving community service hours at the home of aging widow Vivian Daly. The boxes in the attic haven't been touched for years, but Vivian has finally decided that it is time to clear through her old things. Molly and Vivian take on the task together and as they sort through the possessions, memories of earlier times for Vivian reveal that the two women aren't as different as it seems. Vivian, an Irish immigrant, was orphaned in her youth in New York City, and was one of hundreds of children shipped west on what became known as the orphan train. Molly discovers that her youth and perseverance can help Vivian reveal unknown truths about her past, and in doing so, uncover some insight into her own life.

Unleashing Mr. Darcy by Teri Wilson (2013)

index.aspxA cute, modern book with a character named Mr. Darcy. Any Pride & Prejudice fan (or dog lover) would love Unleashing Mr. Darcy. Check out Teri Wilson’s novel today – and visit SheKnows.com for an interview with the author.

Saga. Volumes 1-3 by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples (2012-2014)

index.aspxIt is completely different than anything I have ever read. Every volume of Saga surprises me in new ways. I definitely recommend Brian K. Vaughan’s latest series for anyone who likes graphic novels and/or science fiction (and doesn’t mind mature content).

If you need any other motivation, check out io9’s list of 10 reasons you should be reading this series or this other review.

The Witch Doctor's Wife by Tamar Myers (2009)

index.aspxIn the waning days of Belgian control of the Congo, enthusiastic young American Amanda Brown arrives to manage a missionary guest house. But can Amanda's enthusiasm survive living in a very different culture where witch doctors have power, everyone is named for their own worst deformity, and Belgians control every means of wealth? Amanda, called Ugly Eyes because Africans are disturbed by her blue eyes, proves up to the task since she is open to the beauty and strangeness of the country. Tamar MyersThe Witch Doctor’s Wife is for lovers of Alexander McCall Smith's No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency books, but with more emphasis on the interactions of peoples of different cultures.

The Interestings by Meg Wolitzer (2013)

interestingsSix teens meet at Spirit in the Woods, a camp for the arts, in the 1970s. Julie Jacobson's life is altered in ways she never imagined. As she becomes part of The Interestings, her name is permanently changed to Jules and it is mainly from her point of view that we follow the lives of the six through the next several decades. A crime, a betrayal, and a secret bring the group down to four. Jonah's story is interesting and he remains close to the core group, but chooses never to reveal a tragic incident in his past which holds him at a distance.

Ash and Ethan marry each other and remain close to Jules. Jules has a good marriage with Dennis. He loves her deeply, but can never quite compete with the Interestings' bond. Illness, financial challenges, and even death confront the two couples. Throughout the backdrop of American history, the Interestings test the bonds of family and friendship.

In The Interestings, Meg Wolitzer has created a microcosm of life for the generation that came of age in a post-Vietnam, post-Watergate world, tried to enter the job market at the start of Reaganomics, and have a foot in two centuries: the tail end of the baby boomers who are trying to make sense of their lives.
Tags:

The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin (2014)

The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry is written for those of us who love and work with books. The acrimonious bookseller, A.J. Fikry, is particular about the books he carries in his bookstore and has a long list of genres he will not carry. Gabrielle Zevin incorporates the right amount of humor to transform the snobby bookseller into a lovable character. Fikry has recently lost his wife and is not that concerned with the success of his small bookstore, Island Books. However, after a strange series of events, Firky is forced to change his ways. This is a magical story with plenty of literary references for the reader to enjoy.

The Headmaster’s Wife by Thomas Christopher Greene (2014)

Here’s a novel that will keep you enthralled – I read it in three hours. The Headmaster’s Wife by Thomas Christopher Green is so well written and poetic, and yet also a thriller and a real page turner with several twists.
Tags:

The Whiskey Baron by Jon Sealy (2014)

In the early 1930s, when Prohibition was the law of the land, small time and big time bootleggers and distributors fought for control of the market. In rural South Carolina, Larthan Tull controls both. When small timer Mary Jane Hopewell tries for a cut of the business, murder ensues. As circumstances and bad judgment collide, Sheriff Chambers tries his best to prevent the worst. Jon Sealy’s The Whiskey Baron is a dense, multi-charactered historical novel.

Out of the Deep I Cry by Julia Spencer-Fleming (2004)

index.aspxOut of the Deep I Cry is another suspenseful installment of drama in the small town of Miller's Kill. This mystery spans decades and Julia Spencer-Fleming skillfully goes back and forth naming her chapters - Then and Now. Having this advantage, the reader begins to piece things together even before Rev. Clare and Russ crack the case. Jane Ketchem, mother of Mrs. Marshall from St. Alban's vestry, is still supporting the local clinic thirty years after her death. When Mrs. Marshall decides to give the money to the church, a series of events is put into motion that uncovers family secrets that have been hidden since before her birth.

As Rev. Clare and Russ work closely to uncover the truth and bring the proper people to justice, they find their friendship and their mutual attraction growing stronger. Soul mates is the only term that comes to mind as Spencer-Fleming describes the depth and pureness of their love through beautifully written dialog. The scripture passages and details of the religious ceremonies serve to solidify the morality of the characters.

Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet by Jamie Ford (2009)

This was a moving story of young love facing insurmountable obstacles. Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet takes place in Seattle at the start of World War II chronicling the friendship between Henry, a Chinese-American boy and Keiko, a Japanese-American girl. As the war progresses and the Japanese are forced into internment camps, Henry struggles to make sense of the world around him. Jamie Ford accurately captures life on the home front during this troubled time (find more books that take place on the home front during WWII). The audiobook is a great experience as narrator Feodor Chin effectively distinguishes between each of the many characters.

This book is one of the titles we will be giving away during World Book Night on April 23 at local businesses in the community. Visit ippl.infofor information on our participation in this international event.

The Language of Flowers by Vanessa Diffenbaugh (2011)

From flowers to foster care, from motherhood to mental illness, Vanessa Diffenbaugh takes them all on and creates a very special character by the name of Victoria. She creates the perfect setting for a book about the meaning of flowers - San Francisco! The reader cries for Victoria and roots for her to succeed. She is her own worst enemy. In The Language of Flowers, Diffenbaugh keeps us in suspense until the last minute as to what Victoria's fate will be.

A Circle of Wives by Alice LaPlante (2014)

Palo Alto police detective Samantha Adams is assigned to investigate the suspicious death of plastic surgeon John Taylor. Even though Taylor had a heart attack, he has a puncture wound on his shoulder. The police are also tipped off that Taylor had not just one wife, but three. He had been married to wife number one, Deborah, for over thirty years and they had three children. Wife number two, MJ, is an accountant, with whom he lived in Los Gatos. Helen, a pediatric oncologist, was much younger than John--they met when she asked him to consult on one of her patients.

In Alice LaPlante’s A Circle of Wives, the reader observes the unfolding murder investigation and has a front row seat as all the secrets of each of the four women's lives are laid bare. An engrossing novel that keeps you guessing right up to the end. A great readalike for Tana French's Broken Harbor and A. S. A. Harrison's The Silent Wife.
 

How the Light Gets In by Louise Penny (2013)

After hearing rave reviews of Louise Penny’s mystery series featuring Chief Inspector Armand Gamache, I decided to try her latest one, How the Light Gets In. The audiobook is beautifully narrated by Ralph Cosham, who captures the quaint essence of the village of Three Pines perfectly. This is the ninth book in the series and Chief Inspector Armand Gamache is investigating the murder of the last remaining Ouellet quintuplet, Constance Pinot. Gamache is surrounded by a rich cast of characters from the little village that includes an eccentric poet with a duck for a pet.

Despite not having read any of the previous books in the series, I thoroughly enjoyed this novel and I would like to go back and start at the beginning. A great novel with a cozy winter setting that draws you in.

Whale Talk by Chris Crutcher (2001)

This young adult title will make you cry both tears of joy and anguish as it explores the themes of racism, child abuse, and high school bullying. T. J. Jones, an adopted high school senior of mixed race, takes it upon himself to stop the quarterback of the football team from bullying a mentally challenged student. His plan, which involves creating a new sports team full of misfits, has wonderful highs and stunning lows. It is edgy, but rewarding.

I listened to Chris Crutcher’s Whale Talk on CD (read by Brian Corrigan).
Tags: