The Pig Did It by Joseph Caldwell

The Pig Did It by Joseph Caldwell (2008)
The pig did it and he REALLY did! The fat porker caused the characters to get into turmoil and...LOVE! Set in Ireland's West coast, this novel will bring a smile to your face.

Read reviews at Amazon.com and EW.com.

Tabloid Dreams by Robert Olen Butler

Tabloid Dreams by Robert Olen Butler (1996)Tabloid Dreams provides refreshing tales of ordinary people in their ordinary lives when the quirky and unusual comes knocking at the door. I’d recommend this for anyone who wants something a little different from the rest.

Read the reviews at Amazon.com and visit the author's website.

A Trace of Smoke by Rebecca Cantrell

A Trace of Smoke by Rebecca Cantrell (2009)
This first novel follows an undercover crime reporter in 1931 Berlin as she searches for her brother's killer, a trail that leads from the city's dark underbelly to the top ranks of the rising Nazi party. It is one of several suspense or mystery stories set in Germany or Austria between the two world wars that I have been reading lately, and what a perfect backdrop for suspense it is!

This one is a good read and is a good mystery with a little tragedy, a little romance and some interesting history in the mix. Learn more about the author, check out the reviews at Amazon.com and read an excerpt from the book.

Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet by Jamie Ford

Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet by Jamie Ford (2009)
Middle aged and recently widowed Henry Lee remembers the time during WWII when his best friend, Keiko, a Japanese American girl, was taken away to the internment camps. Henry's father was stubbornly, nationalistically Chinese and disowned Henry--refusing to speak to his son for years. Alternating in time between the war years and the 1980s, the story is a simply told gem about friendship and love transcending both time and distance.

Join our discussion of the book at the library on Wednesday, February 10 at 7:30.

Visit the author's website, check out the reading group guide, and read reviews at Amazon.com.

The Last of the Husbandmen by Gene Logsdon

The Last of the Husbandmen by Gene Logsdon (2008)
Husbandry
is the farming of animals and produce using resources wisely. This book explains how families have struggled to maintain animals and produce in the 20th century. It’s a fast read about farming in Northern Ohio from the 1930s to 1970s. The book includes factual information about how families could earn a living from farming through the generations to when a family could no longer support itself farming.

You'll find the impact of supply and demand along with politics interesting. The farm machinery and growth methods using fertilizers that caused changes in farming from the family to corporations is a reminder of today's dilemma about farm produce. Today people are revisiting organic farming. Get a great overview of farm information in the USA today without a dictatorial presentation.

Read reviews at Amazon.com and read an excerpt from the novel.

The Illuminator by Brenda Rickman Vantrease

The Illuminator by Brenda Rickman Vantrease (2005)
A luminescent and readable portrait of a dark time in history. Set in the 14th century, a time of religious strife, a medieval illuminator with radical views finds himself sharing quarters with a widow struggling to preserve her independence in this enthralling historical novel.

Check out a review and reading guide at Bookreporter.com. Visit the author's website and read an excerpt from the novel.

The Tenth Circle by Jodi Picoult

The Tenth Circle by Jodi Picoult (2006)
This interesting page-turner explores the deep love between a father and daughter. It also shows the horrible aftereffects following a date-rape.

Read an excerpt and check out the reading group guide at Bookreporter.com and be sure to visit this popular author's website.


The Devil’s Company by David Liss

The Devil’s Company by David Liss (2009)
This is third in a series about Benjamin Weaver, a thief taker in 1720s London. Benjamin Weaver is blackmailed into working for a mysterious Mr. Cobb. The exact nature of what Benjamin is hired to do is kept a mystery even from Benjamin himself. As the plot becomes more and more complicated and more and more people seem to be embroiled in the scheme, Weaver must figure out who is working for whom and whom he can trust. A fun and rewarding adventure. You need not have read the first books in the series. I have not.

Read an excerpt from the book, check out the Washington Post review, and visit the author's website.

The Stupidest Angel by Christopher Moore

The Stupidest Angel by Christopher Moore (2004)
This is not a heart-warming story, nor is there any peace, miracles, or goodwill towards men. For those who are sick of sugary sweet Christmas stories, this nitty-gritty tale is a much needed counterpoint. There is an angel, and yes he does a stupid thing by losing his wings. But he is too busy trying to prevent this world from coming to an end. Quirky characters are a delight. Also try Moore’s other humorous novel Practical Demonkeeping.

Preview the book, read a review at Bookreporter.com, and visit the author's website.

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Breakfast with Buddha by Roland Merullo

Breakfast with Buddha by Roland Merullo (2007)Breakfast with Buddha has a simple plot and exposition: a middle-aged man, Otto Ringling, is tricked into driving Volya Rinpoche, his sister’s guru, across the country; but Merullo’s ability to create the spiritual aspects of the journey is remarkable.

Witty and at times really funny Breakfast with Buddha drives the reader through the heart of America (the journey from Notre Dame to Chicago was especially fun) and in the process shows us a man about to discover his own true heart.

Read more about the author, read an excerpt and view reviews at Amazon.com.

A Redbird Christmas by Fannie Flagg

A Redbird Christmas by Fannie Flagg (2004)
This was a short, quick, and delightful read. A wonderful book for the holidays! Overall, a real “pick me up” Christmas story.  If you are in the mood for more holiday stories, check our catalog for more titles.  See some of the recipes mentioned in Redbird at Good Morning America.

Go to Bookreporter.com to read reviews, an excerpt from the book and an interview with the author.
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Scat by Carl Hiaasen

Scat by Carl Hiaasen (2009)Scat is a book in the teen section which parents and grandparents should read and recommend to their children. Carl Hiaasen writes in the same style as he does in his adult fiction, but without the profanity. Adults will find this Florida environmental issue of the black panther very informative. Hiaasen’s quest continues to make his readers aware of environmental issues using interesting topics, writing style and suspense.

Read an excerpt from the book and read reviews at Amazon.com.

Still Life by Joy Fielding

Still Life by Joy Fielding (2009)
This is an interesting fictional tale about a young woman who is in a coma following a horrible hit-and-run accident. It turns out that maybe the hit-and-run wasn’t an accident at all. Very enjoyable!

Visit the author's website to read the first chapter or check out the publisher's site for a discussion guide.

The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini

The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini (2003)
I really enjoyed this book. It has a good story line and well developed characters. I enjoyed learning about Afghanistan and its culture. Read more about the book and view a trailer for the movie. Read the reviews at Amazon.com and use the reading group guide.

Great Dream of Heaven by Sam Shepard

Great Dream of Heaven by Sam Shepard (2002)
Sam Shepard
, a world-renowned playwright, is also an excellent short story author. His collection, Great Dream of Heaven, is innovative, refreshing, fast moving, and brilliant. I found myself reading some of the stories out loud to my friends and family.  Great Dream of Heaven is a must read.

Read an excerpt from “The Remedy Man” at Random House’s website. See what the reviews say at Amazon.com.