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All the Way Home by Ann Tatlock

All the Way Home by Ann Tatlock (2002) This is the story of a young girl who finds a friend and a family with the Japanese American Hatsunes; however, they lose touch when World War II breaks out and the Hatsunes are interned. Years later she is reunited with her friend while working for the civil rights movement. The story is a clever juxtaposition of the social issues—the civil rights struggle of the 1960s and the incarceration of Japanese Americans in the 1940s.

The Kitchen Boy by Robert Alexander

The Kitchen Boy by Robert Alexander (2003)
A man leaves his granddaughter a taped account of his time serving the Russian royal family during their imprisonment. How much of his recollection is the truth? Did any of the Romanovs survive? Find out in this riveting fictionalized account of the months leading to the execution of the Romanov family.

The Legend of Fire Horse Woman by Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston

The Legend of Fire Horse Woman by Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston (2003)
Sayo, born under the disastrous sign of the Fire Horse, comes to California from Japan for an arranged marriage and years later during World War II is imprisoned with her family in a Japanese internment camp. A story which skillfully re-creates the limitations and loneliness of life in the Manzanar camp.

The March by E. L. Doctorow

The March by E. L. Doctorow (2005)
Characters as diverse as freed slaves, Confederate and Union soldiers, a Southern lady, German-born Union surgeon and General Sherman himself populate this very unromantic view of Sherman’s march through the South.

Doctorow was awarded the 2007 Chicago Tribune Literary Prize for lifetime achievement. The Tribune features an October 28 profile article of the author, a 2005 review of The March, and archived articles. Doctorow was presented with the award on November 4 at the Chicago Humanities Festival. You can also listen to an NPR interview about the book.

The Circus in Winter by Cathy Day

The Circus in Winter by Cathy Day (2004)
From 1884 to 1939, the small town of Lima, Indiana, becomes the home in the winter to the Great Porter Circus. These interconnected short stories share the private lives of clowns, pinheads, acrobats and other circus folk during their off season.

Tug of War by Barbara Cleverly

Tug of War by Barbara Cleverly (2007)
Joe Sandilands, a WWI vet working for Scotland Yard, is sent to France to see if a mute former soldier suffering from amnesia might actually be English. The soldier is claimed by several different families as their long lost son or husband, and Joe must wade through each story, some motivated by despair, some by greed, to find the identity of the damaged soldier.

Silent in the Grave by Deanna Raybourn

Silent in the Grave by Deanna Raybourn (2007)
In 1886, Lady Julia Grey sees her husband collapse and die in the middle of a party at their London townhouse. Julia believes her husband died of natural causes, but, “not so” says Nicholas Brisbane, the mysterious and attractive private detective Julia’s husband had hired because he feared for his life. A charming, romantic book of suspense.

Dark Assassin by Anne Perry

Dark Assassin by Anne Perry (2006)
In Anne Perry’s fifteenth book featuring William Monk, the detective witnesses a couple engaged in a heated debate before they fall in the River Thames to their death. Was it murder? Suicide? Monk, with help from his wife Hester, is determined to find out, which leads to the discovery of a larger issue that could destroy all of London.

Zugzwang by Ronan Bennett

ZugzwangZugzwang by Ronan Bennett (2007)
In German, zugzwang is a term used in chess to describe a position in which a player is reduced to a state of utter helplessness. The action is set in pre-Revolutionary Russia: St. Petersburg, 1914. Dr. Otto Spethmann is a psychiatrist who is drawn into a murderous intrigue and an intriguing romance. It’s a deadly game, but good read.

Her Royal Spyness by Rhys Bowen

Her Royal SpynessHer Royal Spyness by Rhys Bowen (2007)
In 1930, Lady Georgine is 34th in line for the English throne. Even though she is penniless, royalty just do not get jobs. Georgine starts a specialized maid service, opening and dusting the London townhouses of the landed gentry before they come up to town. However, Georgine’s only employee is herself. As a maid, invisible to people of the upper classes, Georgine finds herself in awkward positions, overhearing conversations and actually stumbling onto a dead body in this fun mystery.